Archive for July, 2016

Compare Education Views of 2016 Presidential Candidates

Friday, July 29th, 2016

No doubt, no time to linger over the education positions of the presidential candidates for the November elections: the new school year approaches. So, scan this summary.

Donald Trump, GOP candidate, has only a video issues website. In talk, he sticks to education points he has made since 2000. There is too much money, waste, fraud, and abuse in school systems and in the United States Department of Education. It’s not clear what he refers to when he says ‘abuse’ – cruel disciplinary punishment in schools (some evidence exists) or funding abuse.

He threatens to cut the Department of Education because it is a federal body, and it set up the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) that he wants to get rid of. Education should be managed through each local, not the federal, government (i.e. the state). However, The Washington Post’s article by Michelle Ye Hee Lee, 2/2/2016, reminds us that the CCSS was crafted by bipartisan state governors and school chiefs (with major funding from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation), and the decision for states to adopt was voluntary – so it is already a local choice, not federal.

He does know about for-profit higher education, as we’ve all heard. He is likely to desire loosening regulations for accreditation, although he has not approached the higher education issue since word has spread about his attempt at a for-profit college. Also, Trump is opposed to ‘gun-free’ zones on school campuses and, last, he has come out against unions.

 

One can read in depth about Hillary Clinton’s education plans. The most written about is her proposal for higher education students to reduce debt from loans and tuition fees. A student from a family making $85,000 will be compensated to go to a four-year institution by 2017, and a student from a family making $125,000 by 2021. It is proposed to make community college tuition free. States must invest, colleges and universities must account for student success and low tuition. In addition to money for minority student colleges, all proposals will be paid for by limiting tax expenditures for high-income taxpayers.

For K-12 education, the most valuable programs are to modernize teacher preparation, support, and pay; to use a “Modernize Every School bond” to provide capital for infrastructure needs: energy efficiency, asbestos removal, science labs, and high-speed broadband; and to provide universal pre-school and child care investments for which parents pay less than 10% of their income.

 

Now, Mike Pence, Trump’s Vice-Presidential running mate, has one neutral education position: he voted against No Child Left Behind (because of federal intrusion) before the standards were seen as impossible. When he became governor in 2012, he got rid of CCSS to which his predecessor had agreed. He insisted the standards were a federal intrusion. Then he turned around and spent money to devise Indiana’s own standards, suspiciously similar to CCSS. Because of turmoil about CCSS-based testing Mr. Pence paid for a new test based on the Indiana standards. Everyone complained and so another test is being designed to use in 2018. Is this expensive or what?

The governor has been a full-throated supporter of charter schools and school vouchers. A second good thing is he started pre-school programs, but dancing around his dislike of federal money, grant applications have been written, pulled, and submitted again, destabilizing anything good for schools. In addition, he has slashed public school funds in order to pay for corporate tax exemptions.

 

What can Clinton’s Vice-Presidential candidate Tom Kaine bring to the ticket? His emphasis has always been civil rights, but as governor he is known for the gun safety laws he pushed through the legislature after the massacre at Virginia Tech. Also he pushed for high quality pre-K accessibility. He opposes school vouchers. In the Senate, he wrote a bill to extend the interest rate cuts for college student loans and increase in tuition assistance at the state level.

On July 27, 2016, Vice-President Joe Biden reminded voters that “Being a teacher is not what you do, it’s what you are.” That is how Take Care Schools looks at the candidates – to see who is supporting what you are.