Remind Me of Effects of Poverty on Children in School 

Post by CJN

 California high school in region of poverty

California high school in region of poverty

A good thing for schools occurred in the Supreme Court this month. A decision keeps intact the constitutional provision by thirty-nine states to refuse to use funds for vouchers to private and parochial schools. Although the decision allowed funds to refurbish a parochial school’s day care playground, it was a narrow provision that safeguards the states from their voucher prohibition.

In addition, if you didn’t read about an American Federation of Teachers’ poll, 74% of U.S. voters oppose the president’s budget proposal, of which 54% strongly oppose, and of which 48% were Trump voters. The NAACP (2016 national conference) passed a resolution to support a moratorium on charter school expansion. Too many conflicting reports suggested a slow-down.

Upcoming on July 19, Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Education, is the keynote speaker at American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) conference in Denver, Colorado. Interesting to see if there are any revisions in her voucher, civil rights, and budget policies. In August 2017, if the members of Congress do take a recess (some news articles suggest perhaps not) to their home states, it is up to teachers and administrators to hold firm against the president’s budget and voucher agenda. (from www.reclaimourschools.com, 6/30/2017 email)

With the status of school funds legislation and event attendance in mind, the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) has issued a report, The Geography of Child Poverty in California, by Sarah Bohn and Caroline Danielson, February 2017. Every state might replicate the report if not already available. Children of school age are affected by poverty from the day they are born. Of the 1.9 million United States children in poverty, 754,000 live in California. “These adverse circumstances [true in every state] lead to long-term physical, social, and behavioral consequences affecting future education and economic well-being.” p. 1 “Summary,” Geography of Child Poverty.

The major points in the report, although referring to California numbers, affect children in regions of the entire country:

  • One quarter of children live in poverty. This includes Latino, African-American, children of immigrant, young, and single parents. Interventions should focus on these groups.
  • In most poor families, at least one parent works.
  • Coping with housing cost and maintaining work and enough money resources differ in the regions of the state. In some areas, housing cost exceeds more than half of earnings. In others, families manage only by living in over-crowded housing.
  • Safety net programs can help reduce child poverty. However, the impact is better in low cost regions. Poor families in high-earning areas (earn more, but pay more for housing) cannot receive safety net benefits because the requirements don’t take into account the high cost of living.

To correct these facts the state must account for geographic differences in order to adopt approaches that will provide children with economic security. For each geographic region, changes in the housing burden on poor families, safety net adjustments, and employment leading to economic security are the goals.

Looking at Congress and California legislature, there is some hope. The House of Representatives on June 22, 2017 passed HR2353, “Strengthening Career and Technology Education for the 21st Century Act.” The bill will support education in culinary arts, HVAC repair, health care, pre-law, and Emergency Medical Training. Sounds good for every student, especially those who don’t immediately aim for college. However, the bill is now in committee in the Senate, so who knows?

In the California Assembly bill AB 1520 “Lifting Children and Families Out of Poverty Task Force” has passed and is now in the Senate. The legislation provides a task force to look at the problems identified by the PPIC report. The questions are: How long before it becomes actual legislation and is signed by the governor? How long before results are seen from the task force?

May you keep in mind the number and percent of your state’s population that must overcome the long- term circumstances that impoverish families. It’s a systemic problem. Unless government focuses on where poor children live, addresses those entrenched circumstances of poverty, and surmounts them, every child will not manage to do well enough to be lifted out of poverty and succeed in school and post-school.

 

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