Climb Up from the Underrepresented with STEM

Post by CJN

The goal is to prepare every high school student in the United States to be college and career ready. I read Beyond the Messy Truth by Van Jones and discovered a way forward. He wrote about high school students who were capable of downloading every app that came up on their cell phones, but the rare student had any idea how to build those precious apps for every student on the block.

And he asked who is making the money? or creating something new? He wanted to intrigue students with the idea that almost anyone can join the technology field – if your school, even in a low-income community, is equipped to guide you in that direction.

So, how to get past the anxiety and anger about the achievement gap? Where the school funding issue comes in as we’ve seen in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Arizona – but really all over the country. Of course, we want students to be good readers and writers, but mathematics and science are also going to lead to careers. It might be writing about the latest marine biology study or the newest statistical study about plastics in the oceans. If the students can’t code or know computing tech skills, needed in any field, even art and music, they will have trouble in both college and career.

A Department of Labor report says that by 2020 1.4 million computer-science jobs will be in the tech sector. Only 400 thousand students will graduate from a 4-year college or university with a STEM degree.

Look – projects to which schools can direct students or include as part of the STEM curriculum to close the gap for underrepresented people in STEM fields:

  • #YesWeCode is organized to attract disadvantaged, urban and rural, or nontraditional background youth. It runs the biggest scholarship fund in the U.S. to help students gain access to computer-science education.
  • Qeyno Group and Hidden Genius Project, both based in Oakland, California are geared to black male youth who with support can become knowledgeable tech experts and enter college with the skills needed to succeed.
  • The Ford STEAM Lab based in Michigan has the same purpose – to provide programs for low-income youth to succeed during school and after class.
  • Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code are specifically classes for summer or after-school programs to learn tech skills including building apps.
  • Code.org partners with schools to bring tech curriculum into the classroom.

Say you’re the teacher in a school that has seen the light at the end of the tunnel and has established a wide variety of high tech programs, but you’re more interested in teaching students about the physical world, not the man-made technologies that do good and evil to Mother Earth. Computer science plays a part in everything we do in the 21st century, but Clean Technology is the way that won’t destroy the planet.

Where are the students who need to learn about the ways to protect the world? Low-income communities live in the worst areas for green problems like air pollution and water contamination. 68% of African Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, and 80% of Latino communities live in areas that don’t meet EPA standards of air quality.

Remember how in April 2016 three Lakota Sioux teenagers set up a prayer camp at the north end of Standing Rock Sioux reservation to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline route to move half a million gallons of oil a day under the Missouri River – the source of the reservation’s drinking water?

Protest, but also teach about ecology and the climate changes that affect the air, water, and earth. So students will take the college/career path to be the engineer who knows the risks and plans for them. Or the biologist who watches for the leaks that affect the plants and animals. Or the tech who designs a better model that accounts for environmental factors. Or the mathematician who calculates the risks. And the environmental writer who keeps us informed.

Government jobs in the EPA, the Coalition for Clean Air, the Asian Pacific Environmental Network, the Natural Resources Defense Council are just some organizations that need green energy solutions and the high school graduates from all over the country who finish college with the tech skills ready to pursue Clean Technology career fields.

For instance, since 2016 renewable energy jobs are created twelve times faster than in the rest of the economy. Three million jobs were in wind and solar energy alone.

One program oriented specifically for middle and high school students and available all over the country is the Alliance for Climate Education set up in 2010. The facilitators help the school organize Student Action teams that have started Kickstart Recycling projects and Solarize Homes projects. Do One Thing  (DOT) programs motivate students to take one action like turning off extra lights or take one-minute showers.

Take Care Schools’ suggestion is to Do One Thing: make sure your school’s underrepresented students get the high tech and clean tech teaching they need to achieve.

 

 

 

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